Glen Elgin Eco Carers

The Glen Elgin Eco Carers group formed in 2008 and have secured several small grants to work towards achieving the goals of the group.

Taking Action -

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Glen Elgin Eco Carers

The Glen Elgin Eco Carers group formed in 2008 and have secured several small grants to work towards achieving the goals of the group.

The issue

The Glen Elgin Eco-Carers group (GEEC) was established in 2008 by the 11 private landholders located at Glen Elgin, north-east of Glen Innes. The groups members consists of mainly of conservation land managers. This area of land joins extensive areas of National Park and State Forests. The long term aim of the group is to manage sustainably their land which contains the endangered ecological community (EEC) of Eucalyptus pauciflora (Snow gum). Critical threats to the EEC include climate change, clearing, fragmentation, fertilizer application, tree dieback, trampling and grazing by domestic livestock and pest animals, weed invasion and altered fire regimes

The solution

The members of GEEC have worked with GLENRAC staff to develop a Group Action Plan defining the groups goals, the area of operation, the priorities of the group, strategies and actions to achieve these priorities. This plan further details what resources will be required to complete these actions in a 12-month time-frame. In 2015/2017, the group has one active project to address the priority of weeds invasion. Financial support for these activities was obtained through the Northern Tablelands Local Land Services Community Grants program. The action plan was also utilised to develop a project application for the 2016/2017 Northern Tablelands National Landcare Programme Community Grants program.

The impact

The Group Action Plan developed by Glen Elgin Eco Carers has helped the group to clearly define the purpose and priorities of the group. This, in turn, has helped GLENRAC staff to assist the group in identifying sources of potential funding and in developing grant applications. Common priorities for action, such as group succession, have enabled GLENRAC to develop project applications for multiple groups and created efficiencies in developing applications and will result in economies of scale if these applications are successful.  In addition, the plan will be used to communicate with adjoining public land managers such as NPWS and service providers such as local government.

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Key facts

  • One Group Action Plan
  • One current weed control project, valued at $4,715
  • One pending funding application for a flora and fauna field day event

Project Partners