Signposting the song lines

Learning and sharing information along the Wiradjuri Walking Track

Local Links - Stronger Communities -

LLCI010-011

Signposting the song lines

Learning and sharing information along the Wiradjuri Walking Track

The issue

The Wiradjuri Walking Track follows a 42km trail around the city of Wagga Wagga. Did you know that as you walk, ride or run this track you are following a traditional Aboriginal Song Line?  No?  Well, not many people do really.  An Aboriginal Song Line is about the murru (journey) through the garray (land) and ngurambang (country).  These song lines are something that allow Aboriginal people to connect to country, time and place.  A song line can be a place, plant, artwork, people and more… However, these wonderful memories and artefacts of history, culture and heritage along the Wiradjuri Walking Track are not well signposted and often go unnoticed and forgotten.

The solution

The Wagga Wagga Urban Landcare Group (WWULG), in partnership with the Wagga Wagga City Council and Wiradjuri traditional owners, have helped to design and install interpretive signs along the track. The group now aims to develop a brochure relating to indigenous history along the track. Mark Saddler, proud Wiradjuri man, celebrated the newly signposted track by providing a fully guided tour of parts of the track highlighting Wiradjuri special cultural areas.

The impact

At least 25 adults and 11 children now have an understanding of Wiradjuri history, culture and heritage in the Wagga Wagga area. Many more people observe the interpretive signage along the track to help keep the Aboriginal Song Line alive.

Learnings

In learning and sharing we all grow strong and informed.

Images

 

Key facts

  • Song lines allow Aboriginal people to connect to country, time and place.
  • Aboriginal Song Lines are often unnoticed or forgotten.
  • Signage and cultural education tours help to keep the Song Lines alive.

Project Partners