Buffering World Heritage Forest reserve

Controlling invasive species and restoring health and resilience to vegetation on private land as a buffer to World Heritage

Taking Action -

LLCI033-042

Buffering World Heritage Forest reserve

Controlling invasive species and restoring health and resilience to vegetation on private land as a buffer to World Heritage

The issue

Improving connectivity and buffering in a fragmented agricultural landscape containing World Heritage estate.

The solution

Target landholders adjoining or adjacent to conservation estate with native forest in habitat corridors/buffers for involvement in large scale habitat improvement. Proposed actions involving control of lantana, cats claw and other weeds.

  • landholders involved in project planning, monitoring and workshops addressing weed control, fire planning, habitat planning and threatened species management; on 11 sites with excess of 500ha over 3 years.
  • building tracks and using quickspray units
  • 6 local Aboriginal people trained to undertake works
  • fire hotspots workshop available to broader community as well

No opportunities for financial partnerships in the area. Investment was from Federal Government Biodiversity Fund. Partnered with landholders, RFS volunteers and staff. Workshops and planning involved LLS, Forestry NPWS and other Landcare staff.

The impact

Targets achieved; landholders with increased knowledge and awareness; upskilled for maintenance; neighbours have undertaken fire planning; cross tenure planning; regional Crofton weed biocontrol efficacy established; Aboriginal workers with improved skills and reconnecting with Country; strong relationships between Landcare and Aboriginal communities; field workers and landholders working together contributed to reconciliation.

Learnings

We learnt that; years of knowing people and demonstrating integrity pay off as project development and implementation was straightforward and listing participants was viewed favourably by investors. Large scale projects are cost effective and generate community and landholder engagement and capacity building. Large scale projects produce outputs of a scale significant to the scale of the issue and lead to capability and adaptability in project management (eg accessing different sites with respect to weather).

Above all, we confirmed the need for large scale projects that run for 3-5 years to provide continuity of employment and produce large scale results in strategic landscape locations.

Images

Key facts

  • Target landholders adjoining or adjacent to conservation estate.
  • 6 local Aboriginal people trained to undertake works.
  • Neighbours have undertaken fire planning.
  • Cross tenure planning is important.
  • Need for large scale projects that run for 3-5 years to provide continuity.